Intricate Paper Stencils, PART 2: Gift Wrap

This article was written by Martice Smith II

Martice Smith II demonstrates how to make your own gift wrap using intricate, paper stencils

Make the stencils, first! PART 1 of this tutorial can be found here.

Gather Supplies & Tools

Gather supplies and tools

If you have used watercolors, water-soluble pencil or any other water-based mediums on the stencils you created, go ahead and spray 1-2 light coatings of varnish (matte or gloss; it’s your choice) to seal everything in and to prevent bleeding or mixing of colors on your stencils.

1. Position stencils onto kraft paper 

Position stencils onto kraft paper

Unless your stencils are very large, there’s no need to work on large areas for this step. You will be able to control your work surface much easier if you’re able to work in manageable sections, at a time.

Try a layered look by overlapping the stencils.

Don’t clutter too many of your intricate paper stencils in one area. It’s ok to leave some larger areas of kraft paper!

2.  Apply spray adhesive

Apply spray adhesive

Do this step outdoors, as the fumes are very strong and can be harmful or cause irritation to eyes and throat.

On a separate work table, turn over 2 or 3 stencils so that the ‘wrong’ side (the side with no paint) is facing up. Spray each stencil, individually, with an even layer of adhesive. (Sometimes, I allow the spray adhesive to sit on the stencil for about 3 seconds. This will create a stronger bond to the paper.)

Gently place the stencil onto the kraft paper.

Use light pressure from the palm of your hand of fingers to flatten the raised areas of the stencil.

3.  Brush on decoupage medium

09May_MFS_IntricatePaperStencils_PART2_GiftWrap-Pic5

Take your large, bristle brush or a foam brush and generously apply Mod Podge® directly to the stencils.

Depending on the design and delicacy of your paper stencil, spread the Mod Podge®, working from the center, then out to the tips.

4.  Let dry, then trim excess

This step is very important! You need to allow the Mod Podge® to dry completely.

Drying time will vary, depending on how many layers you applied, but a good 15 minutes should be fine.

TIP: If any of your stencils are extending beyond the kraft paper, use scissors to cut off the excess. (Yes, you can use these pieces, too! Go ahead and glue them down.)

5.  Repeat or re-roll

If you like what you see so far, continue adding more of your intricate paper stencils.

When you are done, you can cut off what you need to wrap a package or you can re-roll the kraft paper until you’re ready to start again, later.

Now go wrap some gifts!!

Now you're ready to wrap some gifts!

Now you're ready to wrap some gifts!

Great for mail art packages, too!

Would you like to try 10 more stencil designs? If you’re interested, you can sign up to receive “10 NEW Intricate Paper Stencil Designs”, a free e-book that showcases more of these stunning designs…click here to sign-up to the Uneek Art Letter to get access to download this pdf! (Courtesy of Martice Smith II – Illustration & Design Studio)

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Author bio:

Mixed-media illustrator and designer Martice Smith II

Martice Smith II is creative director of Martice Smith II – Illustration & Design Studio, based in Kansas City, Missouri and owner of Uneek Art Boutique. She established herself as a freelance Illustrator and graphic designer after receiving her Bachelor of Arts Degree.

Martice also contributes as an article writer for the Creating Mixed Media Art website.

You can see more of her work via her Facebook page or her blog. She invites you to join her monthly newsletter, Uneek Art Letter, for art biz tips, advice and free digital goodies!

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

.

.

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Intricate Paper Stencils, Part 1

~ * ~

This article was written by Martice Smith II

Martice Smith II shares a tutorial on how to make intricate, paper stencils using phone book paper

I love creating my own backgrounds for my illustrations and art journal pages. But sometimes, when I’m learning a new technique, I can go through a stack of papers and I don’t want to necessarily throw them away and then, I’m left searching for more paper to use up. So, the next best thing is to re-purpose them by creating something entirely different!

For this tutorial, I will show you how to use pages from a phone book to create these intricate, paper stencils.You can even use up all of those ‘unsuccessful’ gelli prints and breath new life into them with this easy tutorial.

Let’s get started!

Gather Supplies & Tools

Gather supplies and tools

Old Phone book (pages will be torn out)

You can, certainly, use any kind of decorative paper you like for this tutorial. I’m just using up what I already have around the house and adding my own flair to it! Using something old to create something new…

Glue & Gesso

Apply gesso to phone book paper

Supply needed: Glue (not pictured)

I felt that one page of phone book paper was too thin, so I glued two pages together for a little more stability and strength. (The final stencil will still appear delicate.)

Next, use a foam brush or a 2 inch brush to apply 2 light coats of gesso to one side of the phone book paper.

Tip: I like to use a foam brush because it applies an even coverage. I like how the words and numbers peek through the gesso. This will give more depth to the final stencil.

Paint & Decorate

Add color and decorate the phone book paper. Gelli plate prints can also be used!

**If you’re working on pre-designed paper, you can skip this step and proceed to the next step, ‘Create the stencil’.

Make sure you grab the supplies listed in the photo.

Now let’s paint our gessoed phone book pages with acrylics, watercolors, oil pastels- whatever we want! Keep in mind, though: the more layers of paint added, the heavier/sturdier the final stencil will become.

Create the stencil

It really doesn’t matter if your paper is right (paint) side up or wrong side up. Personally, I like to fold the paper with the ‘wrong side’ facing up, simply, because I can easily see the lines I’ll need to draw.

Fold. 

For this particular design, I will need to start with a square sheet of paper.

Since phone book pages measure 7 inches (18 cm) wide by, approximately, 9 inches (22.5 cm) in height, I’ll have to trim the excess.

Take one corner and bring it up, diagonally. Line up the top edges.

Folding paper to make a square

Be sure to crease all folds with a bone folder.

Phone book pages are rectangular so I’ll need to trim off the excess paper, after I make my fold.

Note: There will be a leftover strip that measures, approximately, 2 inches (5 cm) wide by 7 inches (18 cm) in height.

Cut or tear off the strip on the side.

Set this strip to the side, for now. (Later, you can make mini-stencils from this same strip.)

Fold paper

Now your page should look like a triangle.

Fold this triangle in half, twice, in the same direction. Remember to crease every fold with the bone folder.

Now, we’re ready to add our design!

Mark. 

Let’s first visualize what kind of shapes and lines we want our finished stencil to have. There’s no need to measure anything- just go with the flow and enjoy the unique and organic line quality coming from your hands!

Draw a design onto the triangle.

Place the fold on your right hand side. Draw your design onto the paper triangle.

To avoid cutting the wrong lines, shade in the areas that need to be cut away.

Cut out your lines. 

Look for the largest area that needs to be cut away. This particular design calls for me to use scissors, first.

Use scissors to cut out the largest area(s).

Next, determine if you need to continue using scissors to finish cutting out the design. A sharp X-Acto® knife would be a better choice for those narrow, hard to reach areas.

Next, determine if you'll need to use scissors or an X-Acto® knife to cut out the remaining areas.

Use an X-Acto® knife for narrow, smaller, and hard to reach areas in your design.

Tip: When you cut out the smaller areas, DO NOT throw them away! If you’re like me, you love to keep small bits of paper because, who knows? You might want to add them to your next collage! These small pieces can add some much needed color or texture to that ‘unsuccessful’ gelli print you have laying around.

You’ll thank me later for this tip ;)

Look at those beautiful bits of paper! DO NOT throw them away…

This is what the stencil looks like after cutting away a few areas. Don’t worry, we’re not done yet! Small things pack a big punch…you’ll see.

Open

Once you’ve cut out your design, slowly and gently open your intricate paper stencil. Whoa! Isn’t it beautiful?!

: Very slowly and gently, open up your paper stencil.

You can add finishing touches with distress inks, more paint to accent certain areas, embellish with textured stamps or add some glitter, bling bling!

An example of an intricate paper stencil, made from phone book paper.

Did you enjoy this tutorial? If yes, don’t miss Part 2! Look for Intricate Paper Stencils, Part 2: Gift Wrap! I will show you how easy it is to make your own gift wrap using your beautiful, phone book paper stencils.

Until then, have fun and keep creating!

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Author bio:

Mixed-media illustrator and designer Martice Smith II

Martice Smith II is creative director of Martice Smith II – Illustration & Design Studio, based in Kansas City, Missouri and owner of Uneek Art Boutique. She established herself as a freelance Illustrator and graphic designer after receiving her Bachelor of Arts Degree.

Martice also contributes as an article writer for the Creating Mixed Media Art website.

You can see more of her work via her Facebook page or her blog. She invites you to join her monthly newsletter, Uneek Art Letter,  for art biz tips, advice and free digital goodies!

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

.

.

Technorati Tags: , ,

Jennifer’s Eiffel Tower

This article is written by Jennifer Truett

My name is Jennifer Truett (Jennifer Shorter on Facebook) I live in Seaside, California.  I am married, with one son who is 7 years old, two baby dogs and one big dog, a Chihuahua a Chiweenie and a  very sweet Pit Bull.  I love the outdoors but can enjoy staying inside with a good book just as much.  I am new to Mixed Media I just started this journey in April of this year.

Scrapbooking papers, canvas and an Eiffel tower decal were used to create this amazing piece

I created this piece for my Niece Emilee who just graduated High School.

I started by Mod Podging scrapbook paper to canvas.

Scrapbooking papers, canvas and an Eiffel tower decal were used to create this amazing piece.

I added wall art decal of the Eiffel Tower.

Scrapbooking papers, canvas and an Eiffel tower decal were used to create this amazing piece.

I layered it with more paper, painted a wood Fleur De Lis with some gems to add some bling and covered the tower with stained glass pieces.

Scrapbooking papers, canvas and an Eiffel tower decal were used to create this amazing piece.

With acrylic paint, gesso, stencils, ink, felt numbers, mod podge, and my imagination I created this Eiffel Tower piece.

Scrapbooking papers, canvas and an Eiffel tower decal were used to create this amazing piece

This was a fun piece to create and for being my Fourth Mixed Media piece I was pleasantly surprised or should I say super excited when I received a message from Michelle Brown about it from a picture I posted on the Creating Mixed Media Facebook page. I have already learned so much from reading the different posts and from Michelle’s book, “Creating Layers in Mixed Media Art.”  I want to thank Michelle and all of you for your inspiration and beautiful art as I continue my Mixed Media Art journey.

Thank YOU, Jennifer!

.

.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,